Wednesday, June 13, 2018

#AuraArt presents an opportunity to acquire rare collectibles in drawings and paintings by master artist #KrishenKhanna


Aura Art presents an opportunity to acquire rare collectibles in drawings and paintings by master artist Krishen Khanna Well known and widely respected artist Padma Bhushan Krishen Khanna was born in Lyallpur (now Faislabad in Pakistan) in 1925. After attending the Imperial Service College from 1938 to 1942, Krishen Khanna enrolled at Government College, Lahore, from 1942 to 1944. In 1946 he started working with Grindlays Bank. In 1961 he resigned from the bank and devoted his full-time to art. Though in his early works one could see abstractions coming through now and then, it was the human form and the situations of these human beings which anchored him into figuration. His works display a distinct narrative, at times quite representational and direct and at times metaphorical. In some works one can glean the presence of the angst and existentialism which one can see in artists who practiced Modernism from a few decades ago. The way the figures are shown in motion is very reminiscent of Post Impressionist style where the brush strokes dominate and direct the composition as does the play of light and shade in the works. The mastery of line, form, movement and an air of deep emotion is visible in Krishen Khanna’s misty compositions. The people he chooses to portray seem to be hopeful at times, and at times in complete surrender to their destiny. The musicians often bring about an aching melody which rings in the exquisite lines of the works. Krishen Khanna is a painter of rarity and immense grace in our times where social issues grind the life force of the common people. It is an inspiration and an honour to see a veteran’s work addressing humane issues over the decades, which he continues to do so, till date.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Artist #SandeepYadav's Ultramarine Peacocks at #AuraArt


Artist Sandeep Yadav blends the colour blue of an ultramarine hue into the paper and lo and behold a beautiful bird manifests. This is the remarkable skill that this artist has displayed in his beautifully rendered water colour works. Sandeep has a Diploma in Commercial Art from Abhinav Kala Mahavidyalaya along with a Diploma in Painting from Kalasagar Kala Mahavidyalaya Pune. Together his education gives him the know how of handling shape, form, line and colour. His works appear simplistic at first glance and one is tempted to associate the numerous renditions of the national bird, Peacock to some kind of spiritual or religious undertones. Yet, the artist in him implies tranquility in all these works. Whether the bird is shown foraging alone in the woods or forest areas or if there is boy-talk happening at the watering hole in the jungle amongst many peacocks, the impression the viewer is given is that of peace and harmony. In a world torn apart by hate and discrimination, Sandeep waves the gentle fans of love and peace through these exquisite works. The interesting part about these works is that none of these ‘proud’ birds appear proud or arrogant, and that is something to notice in time of fragile egos and easily hurt sentiments. More works by the artist available at www.auraart.in

Thursday, March 1, 2018

RANJANI SHETTAR Seven ponds and a few raindrops @ The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


RANJANI SHETTAR Seven ponds and a few raindrops @ The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY March 12 - August 12, 2018 Indian sculptor Ranjani Shettar (b. 1977) combines natural and industrial materials—such as beeswax, wood, organic dyes, vegetal pastes, lacquer, steel, and cloth—in her large-scale installations. Typically composed of numerous non-representational forms, Shettar's immersive environments are inspired by her observations of the now-threatened natural environs of rural India. For Seven ponds and a few raindrops (2017), the artist molded pieces of stainless steel into a series of sensual, curved, amoebic, shape-shifting elements that have been covered in tamarind-stained muslin. Suspended from the ceiling, the work seems to defy gravity, casting a series of mesmerizing shadows, which, from a distance, evoke the sense of having stumbled upon a surreal, hidden-away oasis. ALSO UPCOMING http://talwargallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ranjanithumb1-150x150.jpg RANJANI SHETTAR On and on it goes on @TALWAR Gallery, New York March 10 - June 30, 2018

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

#TheDancingLine - #ShiavaxChavda at The #JehangirArtGallery


A Retrospective of paintings & sketches of the Master WHAT: ‘The Dancing Line – revisiting Shiavax Chavda’, a Retrospective of paintings & sketches of the master. WHEN: Tuesday October 24th to Monday October 30th, 2017 WHERE: Jehangir Art Gallery, Kalaghoda, Mumbai TIMINGS: 11am to 7pm

The Exhibition of a Painter Extraordinaire #ShiavaxChavda at #JehangirArtGallery


The Exhibition of a Painter Extraordinaire #ShiavaxChavda #JerooChavda #Jyothi #ShanayaChavda #PhirozaChavda #JohnsonThomas #NinaGoel #PhirozaGodrej #RanjitHoskote The Dancing Line - revisiting Shiavax Chavda A Retrospective of paintings & sketches of the Master WHAT: ‘The Dancing Line – revisiting Shiavax Chavda’, a Retrospective of paintings & sketches of the master. WHEN: Tuesday October 24th to Monday October 30th, 2017 WHERE: Jehangir Art Gallery, Kalaghoda, Mumbai TIMINGS: 11am to 7pm For media related information, please call Khushnoor at 9820548125 ‘The Dancing Line – revisiting Shiavax Chavda’ For the first time in 22 years, the family of late artist Shiavax Chavda will be holding a dedicated retrospective of his works at the Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai, from October 24-30, 2017. ‘The Dancing Line – revisiting Shiavax Chavda’, is an opportunity to view a treasure trove of paintings and sketches by the master. This retrospective aims to showcase the versatility of the artist, who over four decades experimented in various artistic styles and created a body of work that is still revered and appreciated by art lovers and students alike. Art lovers will also get a rare opportunity to purchase one of these masterpieces. The exhibition comprises a variety of the artist’s works including his human studies, tempera work, fisherfolk, birds, serpents & animal series, Balinese masks, Indian musicians, classical Indian dancers, semi abstract & abstract art. Considered one of the pioneers of Indian modern art, Chavda was felicitated as fellow of the Lalit Kala Academi in 1986 and awarded Artist of the year by Maharashtra State government in 1990. The artist who was part of the Bombay Progressive Artists movement, held his first show at the Taj Mahal hotel Prince's Room in 1945. He gave top priority to drawing and was considered a master draughtsman. Over his four decade long career, he experimented with paper, canvas, silk, plywood, Chinese ink, crayon, water colour, tempera and oils.
Chavda’s beautiful portrayals of dance in its various forms caught the art world's attention & have made up a large portion of his body of work. He often created sketches of dancers from the Russian Imperial ballet, the Royal Ballet and New York City Ballet, including renowned ballerinas such as Margot Fonteyn and Anna Pavlova. He was also fascinated by animals which he felt were "naked and offer a real test to one's skills of draughtsmanship." Chavda’s paintings are currently exhibited in several esteemed museums including the Victoria & Albert Museum London, Budapest Museum, The National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi, Baroda museum, corporate houses like Tatas and Godrej & Boyce, institutions like Northcote nursing home and other private and public collections in India and abroad. He has held 42 one man shows in Mumbai, as well as a few in Ahmedabad, Djakarta, Singapore, London, Paris, Zurich and New York. The artist passed away on August 18, 1990 at the age of 76. Kekoo Gandhy, a friend and owner of Chemould gallery said in an interview, "I will always like to remember him through his sketch books and his Gouache (tempera) technique (where you mix paint with egg yolk). His draughtsmanship was incomparable. But more than the artist perhaps it was Shiavax the man who had my greatest admiration and respect. He was very warm, dignified and very proper, a far cry from the archetypal shabby artist..."